Nevinsbuzz

Engaging Methuen Readers


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Find the Library At Your Place!

Every year, in the third week of April, we in library land invite you to celebrate National Library Week with us.   The novel coronavirus has caused libraries to close their physical buildings on the recommendation of public health officials and the American Library Association (ALA), but we remain open for business online and continue to support our communities with resources, services and programs.

The Nevins Library has continued our services with an active social media feed (you can follow us on facebook, twitter, instagram, and pinterest); free online access to e-books, audio, and magazines through Libby (Overdrive) and free downloadable music from Freegal.   Some of the new databases we’ve added into our arsenal of resources you can access from home are:  Miss Humblebee’s Academy, an interactive kindergarten-readiness program; High School (Gale In Context)  to support student learning, papers, projects, and presentations; Ancestry From Home, perfect for anyone doing genealogy research; and now at-home access to The New York Times newspaper.

Don’t know what to read?  Try our “What Should I Read Next?” readers’ advisory service or check out our A Book A Day Tumblr for suggestions.  For browse-able collections, look through Libby (ebook and eaudio)NovelistPlus (fiction and nonfiction), the Audio Book Cloud (available through August 31, 2020), and the Romance Book Cloud for those addictive, steamy romances.

For the kiddos, our delightful children’s crew have put together some fun virtual storytimes.  So kids and parents, please continue to sing and read along with us!

If you don’t already have a library card and would like to access these resources, please contact Circulation Services and they will create a temporary card for you.

Thank you to all our library supporters!  We can’t wait to see you again and welcome you back to our physical building.  Until then, continue to use all of our virtual resources and stay in touch!

 

 


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We’re Still Here, physically and electronically!

How to Find the Nevins Library Online

This one won’t be quite as poetic and alliterative as the previous explanation of where we are on the web, but, since we are currently experiencing quite a few changes (and will continue to experience them in the near future) I think it’s important for everyone to know where you can get more information about what is going on.

The first place anyone should go is, I hope, our website. It is always up to date, especially when we are closed (or open). Whether that’s in the winter for snow and other bad and horrible winter things, our next holiday closing, or the unexpected closing.

We also have a ton of other stuff on our website. It’s where you can reserve Museum Passes , get to all the online resources that you can sign into from home, find info on all our programs, from our downloadable and printable Children’s Calendar to our Event Calendar  (which has all the library programs that we do, on site and off site).

We’re on social media as well.  Check out our main Twitter feed @nevinslibrary1! We also have a newish one for the kids too, @nevlibskids. It has reminders and sign up, links for the programs, but, also some fun on it as well. Come and follow us. See if we can get 100 followers there!!

We have an awesome Instagram too @nevinslibrary. All ages are on there, and updates about the library can be found too.

And let’s not forget our 3 Facebook pages!  Our main one, Nevins Memorial Library as well as Nevins Childrens and Nevins Young Adults. You can find updates there, and our events are posted as Facebook Events as well (but, please try to sign up on the calendar on our webite).

Of course, we have this blog. You can always find a variety of things here, from what podcasts we’re liking, to what books we’re reading (and think y’all should try too). You can follow this blog on email as well as coming and seeing us in your browser.

Last, but definitely not least, we have a Tumblr Blog called A Book A Day. It is what it says it is on the tin, every day (well, minus Sunday) a book is recommended. You don’t even need to be a member of Tumblr, just go to the website, and they’re all there (and I do mean all, we have over 1,160 recommendations so far). From sci fi to mystery to graphic novels and even kids books. Something for everyone.

Things probably aren’t going to settle down right away here at the Nevins Library, but we do hope that by following us on one or more of these places that we’ll be able to keep you up to date on the goings on as we get back into the swing of things.


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What’s the Library Worth to You?

I use the library for everything.  It’s true that I work in a public library, so I almost can’t help but use all of their many resources.  Even on a day off, I might still sneak into my local library to use their printer or check out an item, and say “Hi” to the librarians there.

I am a voracious reader (fiction, non-fiction, children’s, teen, adult – you name it!) and can afford to follow wherever my curiosity leads me, because all the library books are free.  When the Grammy nominations come in, and if I am not familiar with certain performers, I will request their music CD’s from the library.  Speaking about “buzz”, there are so many clever cable and streaming TV series these days.  I don’t have cable, nor do I subscribe to Netflix or a streaming service, so I depend on library DVD’s to keep me up to date.  As a resident of Massachusetts I can get an ecard from the Boston Public Library, and use Kanopy to gain access to all the indie films or top-rated documentaries that might not come to the suburban theaters.

Massachusetts is a rich source of museums and other hotspots.  But, as I’m not rich, I check out museum passes from the library to get in free or at reduced price so I can be as cultured as a Boston Brahmin.

Did I say hotspot?  Yes, the library has WiFi hotspots that you can borrow, too!  I found that invaluable when I was away at a place without internet service and had to remain in contact with the wider world.

As an experiment, I calculated the value of my library use from January 1, 2019 to April 11th using the I Love Libraries website calculator.   Taking into account print, electronic, and audio/visual resources as well as computer usage, museum passes, databases, programs that I took advantage of, the grand total came out to…  $1,775.80!  Not a bad investment, considering I got my library card for free!

How much have you saved this year using the library?

Take action for Libraries


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Planning a trip?: Global Road Warrior

Planning a trip?  All you need is a Nevins Library Card and Global Road Warrior.  The World awaits…

To access Global Road Warrior, go to nevinslibrary.org/online-references and click Food/Travel. Scroll down the list of results to find this resource. From there you can find a wealth of information about countries, from food and culture to human rights and travel advisories.

 


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Database Spotlight — Small Business Resource Center

Database Spotlight – Small Business Resource Center

In celebration of National Small Business Week in early May, the Nevins Library is highlighting one of its premier databases provided by the State of Massachusetts.

The Small Business Resource Center is jam-packed with great advice and information for the business owner who is just developing their great idea into a potential business as well as those who want to expand and grow their current business.

It includes things like targeted business plans, sources for funding, advice about the marketing issues and how to get the word out about your small but mighty enterprise.

It can be accessed from home on any computer or other device. And you can use it at any time. 2 pm or 2 am. Once you’ve found the information you need, not only can you download it as a PDF, it can also be transferred to your Google Drive or OneDrive so you can read it on the go.


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Database Spotlight — Gardening, Landscape & Horticulture Collection

Database Spotlight – Gardening, Landscape & Horticulture Collection

Whether you’re a casual gardener, a landscape architect, or a student studying horticulture, the Gardening, Landscape & Horticulture Collection is the database for you.

From info on Rain Gardens, getting the most out of your soil, and even topics like beekeeping, the database has more than 3.6 million articles from so many journals, including Handbook of Flowers, Foliage and Creative Design, and so many more.

No matter if you’re simply very enthusiastic about your flowers and veggies, or you’re a professional landscaper looking for an edge for your company, this is the Database for you!

It can be accessed from home on any computer or other device. And you can use it at any time. 2 pm or 2 am. Once you’ve found the information you need, not only can you download it as a PDF, it can also be transferred to your Google Drive or OneDrive so you can read it on the go.


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Database Spotlight: Global Issues in Context

Database Spotlight: Global Issues in Context

The world is a curious place these days. We are interconnected in a way that we humans really haven’t been in our time here on Earth. And whether you have questions about something you read or saw in the news, or if you need reference materials for your school project, this is the place to get both.

Global Issues in Context offers 250 different country topic pages and more than 400 Issue pages.

There’s also Global Issues Viewpoints, which contains more than 3,000 exclusive commentaries that provide background and guidance on significant topics.

There is even a sidebar on the front page with ‘Featured News’ that pulls from both American and non-American sources.

It can be accessed from home on any computer or other device. And you can use it at any time. 2 pm or 2 am. Once you’ve found the information you need, not only can you download it as a PDF, it can also be transferred to your Google Drive or OneDrive so you can read it on the go.


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Database Spotlight: Health & Wellness Resource Center

Database Spotlight:

Health & Wellness Resource Center

February is American Heart Month. A month to bring awareness to the ways that heart disease can be prevented.

In this Gale Database you get not only authoritative, up-to-date information on the topic of heart disease in an amazing topic portal, but also articles from both scholarly journals and general interest health magazines about treatments and new research into heart disease.

And it’s not just heart disease. Health & Wellness Resource Center offers access to thousands of full-text medical journals, magazines, reference works, multimedia, and more. Perfect for researchers at all levels, this comprehensive consumer health resource provides authoritative information on the full range of health-related issues, from current disease and disorder information to in-depth coverage of alternative medical practices, and more.

It can be accessed from home on any computer or other device. And you can use it at any time. 2 pm or 2 am. Once you’ve found the information you need, not only can you download it as a PDF, it can also be transferred to your Google Drive or OneDrive so you can read it on the go.

Also, try our Health Reference Center Academic Database. It’s a database that is designed more for both nursing and allied health students and provides access to medical and professional periodicals, health and fitness magazines, and reference books and pamphlets.


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eBooks Galore!!

With a new look for our Overdrive website in February (same great content, slightly different look), I thought that I’d  give a refresher on all the amazing ways that you can get both eBooks and eAudiobooks. We’ll start with the most well-known eBook and eAudiobook provider.

Overdrive is our biggest provider of eContent. It has both eBooks and eAudiobooks. In addition to bestselling fiction it also has quite a number of Romances, more childrens’ books every day, and even some Comics (including from DC Comics, Woo!!). You can read and listen to them on your computer,  through your browser, or on almost any mobile device with their free Overdrive App (Scroll down to the bottom for all the various platforms you can use Overdrive on!)

 

 

Axis360 is a part of the Commonwealth eBook Collections. It has both Audiobooks and eBooks, mostly bestselling fiction, that can be read and listened to through the Axis360 App (Again, the links are at the bottom!!)

 

 

 

Biblioboard is a part of the Commonwealth eBook Collections as well. It has everything from the For Dummies series to a good portion of the Dark Horse Comics Graphic Novels to many many Primary Sources and Historical Documents. All Available through your browser or their App.

 

 

If you’re looking for items of a more academic bent EBL has many items to help with academic research as well as items that can help with personal interests, from cooking to gardening. (It’s also part of the Commonwealth eBook Collections). Go to EBL

 

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Finally, Safari has almost 5000 technology, digital media, and business books and videos online and ready on-demand in your browser to help you out of that pickle. Go to Safari

Remember all you need to access all these awesome resources is a Nevins Library card and something to read/listen to them on. And, in most cases, that can even be your computer!!

And if you have questions about using any of the above resources (or our other Online Resources) come see us up at the Reference Desk and we’ll try and get you all set up!!


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Database Spotlight Special: Science Online

Who doesn’t want to know more about the world around us? I know I do, and if you’re like me, you like to learn about that world in infographics. That’s why we at the Nevins Library are proud to present Science Online, a new-to-us database whose mission is to teach you about the natural world.

While there are designated student resources here, they tend to focus on how not to cheat or choose insane research project topics like “Is Area 51 Hiding Aliens?” (Yes, I actually did see that at a science fair once. Clearly, the poor child was Science Online-deprived.) Students may find citeable material here, but for the most part, it is authorless and more like a detailed encyclopedia than not. For preliminary research into a topic, however, Science Online can’t be beat. The E-Learning modules focus on general topics and narrow to cover specifics. For example, the E-Learning module covering Global Warming encompasses climate systems, cycles, and trends, each of those containing several of their own subtopics. A navigation menu on the right allows users to skip to the subtopics they need.

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For teachers, the designated curriculum tools have relatively little of use. Helpfully, they will expound upon the importance of STEM education, but one suspects that professional teachers are already aware. The rest of the site is such a gold mine of infographics, experiments and videos that it’s well worth an educator’s time, however. If you go back to the Home page by clicking on its tab, you’ll see that you have the option of opening diagrams through the menu on the right-hand side of the screen, under “Browse Resources.”. Alternatively, you can scroll down until you see a section devoted to diagrams.

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These diagrams, incidentally, are organized in direct alphabetical order. No subheadings here.

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Perchance you may have noticed the issue with this choice of database structure. Instead of scrolling through the two thousand plus diagrams, try using the handy one-line search interface above.

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From anywhere on the site, a search will turn up a page that looks like this one. That means that if you start searching from the Diagrams page, you’re still going to get article, image, and news results. Click on “Experiments & Diagrams” to see the glory that is the amoeba diagram.

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Click and you get a robust interface from which you can download, print, and share the diagram.

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Advanced search options are located in a rollover menu under the “Search Options” tab. (You can also view your search history from there.) Once you get to the advanced search page, prepare to learn about Boolean, because that’s what you’re going to be using.

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This may seem unfair to you, but as we all know, only things that involve great effort are worth doing.

When you navigate back to the home screen, you’ll see that you also have access to videos, virtual experiments, and biographies. (Biographies will be called “Featured People” and will be at the bottom of the page.)

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The reason I like the bios is that they’re organized in an incredibly useful way. At least, for a grade-school teacher who’s laying out a chronological curriculum.

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Yes, those birth and death dates ARE sortable!

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This function also lets you find bios of people who are still alive.

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Incidentally, you can also sort by description, though that’s nowhere near as useful because there’s no list of standard words by which these bios are categorized and, despite the usefulness of the sorting function, no way to filter by descriptive phrase. Ah well. If you think you know what you want in a bio, try Ctrl+F and search the page that way.

That brings us to the point that Science Online is basically a browsing database. It’s meant not as a hyper-focused research machine but as a general resource – small enough to flip through, lean enough that you won’t get bored with a bunch of useless content. A quick look at the Browse tab will verify that this resource is meant to be perused rather than extracted.

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That’s the rollover menu for the Browse tab. Look at all that stuff as compared to what’s available when you try to use the advanced search!

Most of the time, I advocate that the first thing a database user should do upon discovery of a new resource is to learn how to search it. In this case, I recommend the opposite. To get the most out of Science Online, prepare to spend a couple hours and have a vague idea of what you need. You’ll easily browse to the sections you want and quickly and efficiently gain the background you need to move forward.