Nevinsbuzz

Engaging Methuen Readers


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Outdoor Twitter

Free picture: bird, family, nestNow that a lot of us are at home each day, it is a good time to get outside and enjoy our local nature (while practicing proper social distancing!) Spring is a bird migration season, and the added quiet of having less traffic in my town has really helped me to notice the many feathered friends that we share the area with. Below are some great resources to learn more about this fascinating variety of creatures!

Check out the Mass Audubon Outdoor Almanac for April on birds and critters that are resurfacing this month after a long New England winter.  During walks in our neighborhood and town wildlife reserves, my husband and I were able to spot and/or hear the black-capped chickadees, Spring peeper frogs, and painted turtles.

If your are new to birding, or just curious, and you don’t have a guide book at home, try the online authoritative Audubon Society’s Guide to North American Birds for visual and song identification.

Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology All About Birds guide let’s us discover birds from home in a myriad of ways:

Birds - Marsh - Billings - Rockefeller National Historical Park ...Enjoy the beautiful, full-color photographs and informative details of DK’s American Museum of Natural History Birds of North America without the heft by accessing the ebook via Overdrive.  Curious about bird intelligence?  Listen to Jennifer Ackerman’s e-audiobook, The Genius of Birds, as she travels around the world to the most cutting-edge frontiers of research on bird development.  For an engaging and personal account of living with and observing birds, you’re in for a treat with Sy Montgomery’s Birdology:  Adventures with a Pack of Hens, a Peck of Pigeons, Cantankerous Crows, Fierce Falcons, Hip Hop Parrots, Baby Hummingbirds, and One Murderously Big Living Dinosaur also available in Overdrive.

Now, go outside, look up and tell us what you see or hear!

 

 


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Program: Spring Bird Migration

Spring Bird Migration on the North Shore

Thursday March 19, 2020 7pm

What is spring migration? We all know about the birds that arrive in spring, but what about the ones that are just passing through?

Join us as David Moon will show participants where, when, and how birds flow through our region, how to see them, and why they matter.

David Moon is Sanctuary Director for Mass Audubon’s Joppa Flats Education Center in Newburyport, MA, where he provides administration and leads birding tours every week, from Plum Island to destinations across the continent and around the world. David has been going to Newburyport to see birds on Plum Island since 1979.  He has been an environmental educator for over 35 years in both classrooms and non-formal settings.

To register for this program, CLICK HERE.  For more information, contact Kirsten at 978-686-4080 x12 or kunderwood@nevinslibrary.org


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Great Backyard Bird Count 2019

How Many Birds Can You Find?

 

During President’s Day weekend this year, February 15th-18th, there is an amazing science project that families or individuals can do (and the statistics that you all will compile help professional scientists with their work).  It’s called the Great Backyard Bird Count.

You don’t have to come to the library to be a part of it, you don’t even have to leave your home or neighborhood. It’s easy to participate:

1. Login or Register for the count via www.birdcount.org (you can do this at home, or, if you’d like some help, come on up to the Reference Desk and we can get you all set up).

2. Count birds for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the GBBC (Monday’s even a holiday for most). You can even count for longer than 15 minutes if you wish!

3. Count birds in as many places and on as many days as you like—one day, two days, or all four days. Submit a separate checklist on eBird for each new day, for each new location, or for the same location if you counted at a different time of day. Estimate the number of individuals of each species you saw during your count period.

4. Enter your results on the GBBC website by clicking “Submit Observations” on the home page. Or download the free eBird Mobile app to enter data on a mobile device.

The Sibley Guide to Birds by David Allen Sibley

A Field Guide to the Birds by Roger Tory Peterson

All the Backyard Birds: East by Jack L. Griggs

The Birds of America by John James Audubon

For more Info (and a really, really cool checklist), here’s a PDF file you can print out at home (we’ll have some here too!!).

Happy Counting!!


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How Many Birds Can You Find?

black-capped-chickadee-1520300_2During President’s Day weekend this year, February 17th-20th, there is an amazing science project that families or individuals can do (and the statistics that you all will compile help professional scientists with their work).  It’s called the Great Backyard Bird Count.

You don’t have to come to the library to participate, you don’t even have to leave your home or neighborhood. It’s easy to participate:

  1. Login or Register for the count via www.birdcount.org (you can do this at home, or, if you’d like some help, come on up to the Reference Desk and we can get you all set up).
  2. Count birds for at least 15 minutes on one or more days of the GBBC (Monday’s even a holiday for most). You can even count for longer than 15 minutes if you wish!
  3. Count birds in as many places and on as many days as you like—one day, two days, or all four days. Submit a separate checklist on eBird for each new day, for each new location, or for the same location if you counted at a different time of day. Estimate the number of individuals of each species you saw during your count period.
  4. Enter your results on the GBBC website by clicking “Submit Observations” on the home page. Or download the free eBird Mobile app to enter data on a mobile device.

The eBird mobile App is available on both iTunes and the Play Store.

There are also two other awesome Apps that may help you in IDing birds, Merlin ID, which is also available on iTunes and the Play Store. And the Audubon Birds of North America App which is available on not only iTunes and the Play Store, but the Amazon App Store.

Or, if you prefer the heft of a book that you can page through, we have field guides like:

sibleyguideThe Sibley Guide to Birds by David Allen Sibley

peterson80sA Field Guide to the Birds by Roger Tory Peterson

allthebackyardbirdsAll the Backyard Birds: East by Jack L. Griggs

audubon_birdsofamericaThe Birds of America by John James Audubon

For more Info (and a really, really cool checklist), here’s a PDF file you can print out at home (we’ll have some here too!!).