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Engaging Methuen Readers


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Children’s Book Week!

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Nevins Memorial Library is Proud to Be a 98th Anniversary Children’s Book Week Event Host

May 1-7 is also the finale of voting for the sole book awards chosen only by kids & teens

As the longest-running national celebration of books for young people and the joy of reading, over 650 schools, libraries, and bookstores will host official Children’s Book Week events between May 1-7 from coast to coast in all 50 states.

 

This May marks the 98th anniversary of Children’s Book Week; the theme for this year’s celebration is “One World, Many Stories.”

Voting for the 10th Annual Children’s & Teen Choice Book Awards, the only book award voted on solely by kids & teens, has been in progress since March 3, and many locations will hold group voting in the class, store, or library from May 1-7, when voting ends.

We are proud to be hosting the following event in celebration of Children’s Book Week:

Wednesday, May 3rd 2017

Nevins Memorial Library, 4:00-5:00pm

Kids in grades K-3 are invited to join in on special activities and games

to promote a wonderful week of reading!

To register go to nevinslibrary.org and check out our Calendar of Events.

Children’s Book Week is a cornerstone program of Every Child a Reader, a 501(c)(3) literacy charity dedicated to inspiring a lifelong love of reading in children and teens across America. Other national programs include the Children’s and Teen Choice Book Awards, Reading Without Walls, and the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, in partnership with the Library of Congress. Individual and corporate donations, grants, and the Children’s Book Council support Every Child a Reader.

Go to nevinslibrary.org for more information about children’s programs and to register for the event.

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The Post-Holiday Season

The holidays are over and that means one thing: the sun’s coming back! Hooray! Our glad tidings and gamboling have pleased the powers. Now’s the time to get happy again. Let some light in. Have some fun!

To this end, I’ve asked several people around the library what they consider worth doing during these cold winter months and what books they’d recommend to those ends. Here are their answers.

Anna

Reference Department

1635446I play a lot of Minecraft. If you’re under 15, you are already familiar with the novelizations. However, did you know that you could learn to program Python with Minecraft, too? It’s true! You can play a highly addicting game and become a master programmer at the same time. Because winter is for geeky pursuits.

 

 

 

Tatjana

Reference Department

1533085.jpgTatjana knows how to make the days merry and bright! A hearty winter cocktail will warm your winter in style. We’re not talking about your average appletini or margherita, either. If you’ve never had hot mulled cider, then it’s time to grab your mug and fuzzy socks.

 

 

 

Kathleen

Reference Department

1660151So you got a million sweaters during the holiday, but not one of them is in any way attractive or aesthetically appealing. Time to break out that dusty old sewing kit! Stitch your things up whimsically and revel in your victory over the gift-giving season.

 

 

 

 

Gladys

Reader Services Department

1573321Sure, you’ve heard of this book, but have you taken it to heart? Tidying up really can change your life. Not only will you experience the bliss of a clean space, but you’ll have an extra few hundred dollars from all the change you’ll have found in your couch cushions.

 

 

 

Kathy

Children’s Department

862950Obviously, librarians are going to recommend that you catch up on your reading list. But if you’re all read out, to the extent that you can’t imagine a book that you haven’t read, what can you possibly do to continue reading? Librarian action figure Nancy Pearl has you covered, lustfully.

 

 

 

Amy

Teens Department

bingeLibrarians are not just about books. No, not by a long mile. Librarians are also about movies! But wait, librarian friend, I hear you say. I have no Netflix password, nor Hulu access. Alas, my life is a misery. I respond thusly: you haven’t been reading our blog. Binge away.

 

 

 

Tracy

Reader Services Department

puzzleDid you know that the Nevins Library has an active jigsaw puzzle going in our fireplace room? It’s true! So now, in addition to books and movies and cleaning up and other snuggly winter pursuits, you can stop by and help us do our puzzle. And the next one too. And the one after that.

Aren’t the post-holidays wonderful?


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Bowie in Books

Today, we mourn the passage of the great David Bowie. The best commentators in the world have already weighed in on the impact of this incredible musician and performer, but we at Nevins Library would like to take a minute and recognize him as a literature hound. An avid reader, Bowie was a fan of William Burroughs, George Orwell, and Heinrich Harrer, and much of his work bore a debt to Sigmund Freud and Friedrich Niezsche. What we’re saying is that David Bowie was smart and he liked books. Without any more ado, here are just a few of the songs that reflect the legendary artist’s literary tastes.

1984

They’ll split your pretty cranium and fill it full of air/And tell that you’re eighty, but brother, you won’t care/Beware the savage jaw of 1984.

Did you know that Bowie intended to write a musical based on George Orwell’s classic 1984? He never managed to pull it off (Orwell’s widow objected) but if you listen to his 1974 album “Diamond Dogs,” you’ll catch references to Orwell’s most famous dystopian work in the songs Big Brother, 1984, and We Are the Dead.

Oh! You Pretty Things

Look out my window and what do I see/A crack in the sky and a hand reaching down to me/All the nightmares came today/And it looks as though they’re here to stay.

One prevailing rumor suggests that this song was inspired by Ayn Rand’s classic Anthem. Since David is “thinking about a world to come/Where the books were found by the golden ones,” this seems possible. However, it seems at least as likely – or more so – that the lyrics reference the works of Aleister Crowley, a British occultist; and Friedrich Nietzsche, an influential philosopher.

Silly Boy Blue

Mountains of Lhasa are feeling the rain/People are walking the Botella lanes/Preacher takes the school/One boy breaks a rule/Silly Boy Blue, silly Boy Blue.

When David Bowie was 19, he was inspired by the works of Jack Kerouac to become a Buddhist. But it was Heinrich Harrer’s book, Seven Years in Tibet, that inspired this song, which was one of the pop artist’s firsts.

The Man Who Sold the World


Though many people think of this as a Nirvana song, it’s actually a cover of Bowie. Here is the first verse:

We passed upon the stair, we spoke of was and when/Although I wasn’t there, he said I was his friend/Which came as some surprise I spoke into his eyes/I thought you died alone, a long long time ago.

And here is the first stanza of Hughes Mearns’ 1899 poem “Antigonish:”

Yesterday, upon the stair,/I met a man who wasn’t there./He wasn’t there again today,/I wish, I wish he’d go away…

If you notice a few parallels, that’s because Mearns inspired Bowie to write this song!

If this list has you wishing that you could listen to some David Bowie right now, be sure to check out his discography. Many of his albums are available through Nevins or the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium:

Ever the showman, David Bowie also appeared in a number of films. Check these out for a sample of his ouvre: