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Engaging Methuen Readers


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When Children’s Fantasy Became A Reality

Fantasy isn’t new. The Brothers Grimm recorded fantastical stories back in the 19th century, and prior to that time, tales of dragons and warriors of stunning prowess dominated ancient literature and mythology. Originally, however, there was no distinction between fantasy for adults and fantasy for children. In fact, when the Grimms originally published the fairy and folk tales they collected from the hardworking people of far-flung corners of Europe, they were stunned to realize that well-off city people were reading them to their children. These were dark, gory tales, replete with violence and rape, that expressed complicated adult topics in metaphorical language. The Grimms had never dreamed that people would try to use them as bedtime stories.

Needless to say, they hastily printed a more kid-friendly “small edition” of their fairy tales, filing down some of the grittier details and adding a lot of pictures and Christian imagery.

The whole idea of kid-friendly stories was relatively new to the 1800s. Prior to that, kids were, at best, little adults. At worst, they could be put to work on a farm or in a factory. Childhood wasn’t considered a special time until industrialization generated a middle class, which then advocated against child labor and for education. We have an 1800s reform movement, which arose in reaction to the Industrial Revolution, to thank for the idea that people should spend their early years being educated.

Once people decided to start teaching kids instead of exploiting them, they quickly realized the value of letting kids read. Already, public libraries had caught on as a way to improve the masses and make them content in their social stations, although the reality of libraries often skewed toward entertaining the masses and making them question the status quo.

Thus it was with the development of children’s fantasy. Brothers Grimm stories painted over with Christian morality paved the way for Victorian fables like Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies, an 1863 morality story so mawkish and racist that it’s a little shocking that it was ever considered a mainstay of children’s literature. Nevertheless, it was an entertaining way to force moral and social education down the throats of children. Speaking Likenesses by Christina Rosetti (1874) fell along the same moral themes. Even Oscar Wilde’s fables usually imparted a lesson of some kind. However, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, published just two years after The Water Babies, moved away from moral education and proved much more enduringly popular with both adults and children. Despite its wacky, nonsensical veneer, Alice was essentially about growing up in a world that often seemed distressingly random and absurd.

Subsequent fantasies for children, like J.M. Barrie’s early 20th-century novelization of his popular play, Peter Pan, explored territory that the Grimms might have recognized. Barrie’s titular hero, Peter, wore dead leaves, kidnapped children, never aged, and flew – all traits of a ghost in a story that grappled with mortality. The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, which debuted in 1900, also opted to entertain rather than preach and tapped themes of responsibility and friendship.

The 20th century would see a boom in children’s fantasy literature. In 1950, The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe sought to revive the Christian allegory couched in an entertaining fantasy novel for children, while The Fellowship of the Ring generated a British mythology in 1954. Children’s fantasy continued to flourish in the 1960s, when books by Madeline L’Engle would follow in the religiously overt footsteps of C.S. Lewis, while others by Ursula LeGuin would seek to express more primal, mythologically inspired themes.

Since the 1960s, children’s fantasy has burgeoned to include works as diverse as Roald Dahl’s Matilda and J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. They run the gamut of themes and serve a vast array of audiences. Recently, fantasy for children has begun to focus on authors and characters of marginalized demographics, who haven’t generally historically experienced a great deal of representation in this genre. Female authors, authors of color, and LGBTQ authors are all experiencing an increase in representation among children’s fantasy.

As children’s fantasy continues to grow in popularity, it will continue to evolve to suit new generations of reading children. Where it goes next is anybody’s guess. However, wherever that is, both kids and adults will avidly follow.


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Review: “The Voyage of the Basilisk”

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In this third installment of the memoirs of Lady Trent, hero and dragon naturalist Isabella must navigate treacherous seas, international politics, and quasi-Victorian concepts of propriety in order to study the dragons of many continents. From sea-serpents to fire-drakes, any dragon that needs studying is worth endangering life and limb for.

This was unquestionably an entertaining book. Written in a Victorian-esqe style, it was a convincing anthropological tale of a world analogous to ours. While its criticisms of 19th-century class and gender mores wasn’t necessarily original, it was still fun to root for a heroine who was on the right side of future history. A little gender studies-worthy cultural mix-up is handled with aplomb and enriches the story.

But I kept expecting more from this book, which had clearly been so thoroughly researched. I don’t know if I’d feel differently if I’d read previous Lady Trent stories, but this just felt oddly light in the loafers. Maybe I’m too used to Hollywood, where she’d get the guy and be accepted into the Highly Literate Society and overcome all barriers triumphantly to a gigantic round of applause, all within ninety minutes. This wasn’t really that kind of instant-gratification story. In fact, Isabella doesn’t get even half of what she wants in the end, though she achieves enough in the way of small victories to be satisfied for the moment. That’s definitely in keeping with the book’s emphasis on realism – as if to counterbalance the magical implications of dragons and ancient civilizations and all that, the book is studiously, stubbornly magic-free – and many readers will appreciate it.

As for me, I wanted her to shack up with the dude, fight the bad guys with cutlasses, and rule over a dragon sanctuary with the power of sea-serpents. I’m a big explosions kind of girl. Victorian-style literature in general has always been too staid for my taste, and while I enjoyed this and recognize that it’s a sophisticated and interesting piece of work, I’ll probably gravitate back toward Stephen King and David Wong after this.

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